In the Shadow of Juicetrump

A Belchford walk posted on 26/07/19 by Lincolnshire Wolds. Update : 23/08/19

This walk links the quiet villages of Belchford and Scamblesby in the heart of the Lincolnshire Wolds. Enjoy grassy paths, a stream and some fine hilltop views. There are numerous springs nearby which first attracted Neolithic settlers to the area. Two streams converge here to form the source of the River Waring, which flows to Horncastle to join the River Bain.

Technical sheet
Calculated time Calculated time: 2h05[?]
Distance Distance : 6.77km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 64m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 56m
Highest point Highest point : 134m
Lowest point Lowest point : 76m
Average Difficulty : Average
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : Belchford
Starting point Starting point : N 53.261482° / W 0.065741°
Download :
Logos Logos

Description

The route is waymarked with a blue bell symbol.

(D/A) Start the walk on the footpath beside the bungalow on Main Road. (To reach the start, with the Blue Bell Inn behind you, turn right down Main Road. The bungalow and footpath are on your right.)

The outward half of the walk follows the Viking Way.
The Viking Way is a 147 mile long distance footpath running from the Humber to Oakham in Rutland.

(1) Walk along the field edges, cross the footbridge over the River Waring and continue along the public footpath with the hedge on your left.

(2) Juicetrump Hill is on your right. Some believed this ‘unnatural’ wedge-shaped mound was a Neolithic ‘longbarrow’. It is however a type of limestone outcrop – called roachstone. Roachstone is a rock formed of a harder material than the underlying Tealby clays and limestone, and so weathers more slowly, leaving strange looking hillocks. (There is no public access to Juicetrump itself.)

(3) Belchford Wood is an ancient semi-natural woodland, which is carpeted in spring with bluebells beneath the ash and oak trees.

As you go past Belchford Wood you have good views northwards over Scamblesby and to the preserved World War II mast at RAF Stenigot. This was one of the country’s first radar stations, coming into operation at the beginning of the war.

Go through the first gate and continue through the second gate to Scamblesby. Follow the Viking Way to join a farm track, then a metalled road.

(4) Follow Mill Lane towards Scamblesby to a public footpath on your left, just past the last house on your left, opposite White House Farm. (If you reach a road junction, you have gone too far.)

If you need refreshments, continue straight ahead to the Green Man Inn, with its unusual sign. Retrace your steps to rejoin the walk.

(5) Turn left onto the footpath, leaving the Viking Way. Cross the field, go through a gap in the hedge and turn left. Continue through a section of trees. Where the path is crossed by a bridleway, turn left through the hedge and go uphill, across the next field. Head for the left hand edge of the hedge on the skyline. Go through the gap and continue through a gate, then head for another gate at the corner of the next field.

(6) Follow the track through Flintwood Farm where, in the field to your left, numerous ponds have been created and trees and wild grasses have been planted and sown to create a wildlife haven (there is no access to this area). Continue downhill until you reach a road. Turn left and return to the start.(D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : km 0 - alt. km 0
1 : km 0.62 - alt. km 0.62
2 : km 0.88 - alt. km 0.88 - Juicetrump Hill
3 : km 1.49 - alt. km 1.49 - Belchford Wood
4 : km 2.58 - alt. km 2.58
5 : km 3.85 - alt. km 3.85
6 : km 5.29 - alt. km 5.29 - Flintwood Farm
D/A : km 6.77 - alt. km 6.77

Useful Information

Maps: OS Explorer Map 273

Parking: Considerate parking in the village.

Terrain: A mixture of footpaths, tracks and roadside walking - may be muddy in places.

Stiles: A few.

Refreshments & Toilets: Pub.

The Lincolnshire Wolds is a nationally important and cherished landscape. Most of it was designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) in 1973. Covering an area of 558 square kilometres or 216 square miles, the AONB contains the highest ground in eastern England between Yorkshire and Kent, rising to over 150m along its western edge. Rolling chalk hills and areas of sandstone and clay underlie this attractive landscape.

The Lincolnshire Wolds has been inhabited since prehistoric times and the appearance of the countryside today has been greatly influenced by past and present agricultural practices.

A Countryside Service helps to protect and enhance the landscape through partnership projects with local landowners, farmers, parish councils, businesses and residents of the Wolds.

Office Address :
Lincolnshire Wolds Countryside Service
Navigation Warehouse
Riverhead Road
Louth
Lincs LN11 0DA

Phone: 01522 555780 Twitter: @LincsWoldsAONB

Website: https://www.lincswolds.org.uk

Hikideas and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

Belchford is first recorded as ‘Beltsford’ in 1086 and is probably named after a ‘ford of a man called Belt’. The village is in the centre of an area rich in archaeological finds, from ancient flint arrowheads to Neolithic polished stone axes.

Until relatively recently this was a sheep grazing area with wool being of great importance to the local economy. Since the 1939-45 war, wheat, barley, oilseed rape and sugar beet have been extensively cultivated.

The South Wold Hunt’s Opening Meet (the first of the season) always starts at the Blue Bell Inn on the old village green. The building opposite the pub was once the village smithy.

The barn owl is a common sight around the area. It can often be seen in broad daylight, flitting along hedges and rough grassland hunting for voles. Other birds that may be seen include lapwings, skylarks and yellowhammers.

The sharp-eyed might spot a speckled wood butterfly on a summer day near Belchford Wood. Look out for the plant Jack-go-to-bed-at-noon, also called goat’s beard.

The Lincolnshire Rising 1536 - In 1536 Henry VIII persuaded Parliament to pass a bill authorising the dissolution of the smaller monasteries. Nicholas Leach the rector of Belchford, fearing the loss of church treasures and extra taxes to pay, marched with his brother and 3,000 men on Lincoln. The rebellion quickly collapsed - Nicholas was hung, drawn and quartered at Tyburn for treason.

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.